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Officer's brother: 'Obama could have made this all go away'

Bob Unruh - WND

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© 2010 WorldNetDaily

Lt. Col. Terrence Lakin

An attorney-doctor from Kansas whose brother is scheduled for a court-martial says President Obama could, if he chose, resolve the dispute virtually without effort.

Greg Lakin, whose brother is Lt. Col. Terrence Lakin, told talk radio show host Peter Boyles on KHOW radio in Denver that it would be "easy."

"It could have been an easy fix. Obama could have stepped up and done the honorable thing and made this all go away," Greg Lakin said in the interview this week. "Just some type of showing, 'Hey, I was born here … here's some proof.'"

WND reported a new trial date has been announced by the military for Lt. Col. Terrence Lakin, the career Army doctor who decided to refuse an assignment to Afghanistan because of his concern that the orders he was issued in a chain of command headed by Barack Obama were not legal.

According to attorney Neal Puckett, who has represented Lakin since a military judge ordered Lakin could not have access to any information about President Obama's eligibility, the trial is scheduled to begin Dec. 14 and run for three days.

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He confirmed to WND that there will be new directions for the defense but could not elaborate.

"All I can really say is the case is going to be handled differently from here on out," he said.

Greg Lakin said he fears the military, which he said never has had to confront the possibility that a president may not be eligible and his orders then may be illegitimate, may take the easy way out and simply lock up his brother.

"I wrote letter after letter, personally, to Mr. Obama," he told Boyles.

He said he explained to the president, "This is your issue. This is an easy fix. … Just show him or the Army or anybody in authority that you have this birth certificate. … It went unanswered."

Lakin said the issue appears to be "tearing" at the nation, and now with a change in power in the U.S. House, perhaps someone there will take action or the "Supreme Court will act like the Supreme Court of old and not shy away from the issue."

Greg Lakin now practices medicine in Wichita, Kan., following a career that included stints as a police officer in Greeley, Colo., and a prosecuting attorney in Hawaii.

He said his brother made the decision to challenge the president thoughtfully.

"He's very principled. What's right is right. He really wants to get to the truth," he said.

Greg Lakin said he was unsurprised by his brother's decision.

"He loves the Army. He doesn't wish to harm the Army. He just wanted to make sure the orders he received were lawful," Greg Lakin said.

Lakin's strategy in earlier court appearances was to seek verification of the legality of his orders under Obama. But the military's judge has ruled he cannot access Obama's records nor can he question those who have custody of Obama's records. She even ruled he could not explain that he believes the orders are illegal.

It is possible that Lakin's case ultimately will end up before the Supreme Court, which may have difficulty ruling that he has no "standing" in the dispute. Virtually every other judge to date has concluded plaintiffs challenging Obama's eligibility lacked standing. But Lakin's case might be different because of the threat of jail time.

The American Patriot Foundation, which has been running the Safeguard our Constitution website and working in support of Lakin, has confirmed the public can use the channel to support Lakin.

There have been dozens of lawsuits and challenges over the fact that Obama's eligibility never has been documented. The "Certification of Live Birth" his campaign posted online is a document that Hawaii has made available to those not born in the state.

Lakin has been charged by the Army with missing a movement, disobeying a lawful order and dereliction of duty.

He posted a video asking for the court-martial to determine Obama's eligibility.

He is board-certified in family medicine and occupational and environmental medicine. He has been recognized for his outstanding service as a flight surgeon for year-long tours in Honduras, Bosnia and Afghanistan. He was also awarded the Bronze Star for his service in Afghanistan and recognized in 2005 as one of the Army Medical Department's outstanding flight surgeons.

The controversy stems from the Constitution, Article 2, Section 1, which states, "No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President."

A number of challenges and lawsuits have been based on the constitutional requirement, some alleging Obama does not qualify because he was not born in Hawaii in 1961 as he claims. Others say he fails to qualify because he was a dual citizen of the U.S. and the United Kingdom when he was born, and the framers of the Constitution specifically excluded dual citizens from eligibility.

Complicating the issue is the fact that besides Obama's actual birth documentation, he has kept from the public documentation including his kindergarten records, Punahou school records, Occidental College records, Columbia University records, Columbia thesis, Harvard Law School records, Harvard Law Review articles, scholarly articles from the University of Chicago, passport, medical records, files from his years as an Illinois state senator, Illinois State Bar Association records, baptism records and his adoption records.

Lakin posted a YouTube video challenging the Army to charge him over the issue.

In a later video, Lakin said the issue of evidence is important:

Note: A legal-defense fund has been set up for Lt. Col. Terry Lakin.


Nov. 10, 2010